Hear the Art
Hear the Art
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lazybonesillustrations:

Flesh + Dalmatian spots// lazybonesillustrationsdrawn in MS Paint
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instagram:


Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms
To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram. 
On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.
The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.
This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.
“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”
instagram:


Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms
To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram. 
On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.
The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.
This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.
“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”
instagram:


Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms
To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram. 
On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.
The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.
This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.
“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”
instagram:


Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms
To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram. 
On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.
The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.
This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.
“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”
instagram:


Celebrating 175 Years of Photography in All Its Forms
To view more photos and videos from the Impossible Project InstaMeet, browse the #ImpossibleProjectMeet and #ImpossibleColour hashtags and follow @tomskipp, @impossible_hq and @thephotographersgallery on Instagram. 
On August 19, 175 years ago, Frenchman Louis Daguerre announced he had created the first permanent photographic process.
The same year, British inventor Sir Henry Fox Talbot unveiled a series of photographs made using the calotype process years earlier, famously capturing the first photographic negative of the latticed window at Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire, England. The daguerreotype and calotype processes went on to create the type of photos we take today.
This weekend, a group of Instagrammers celebrated the anniversary by exploring the overlap between old and new forms of photography in a daylong workshop at The Photographers’ Gallery (@thephotographersgallery) in London. Armed with vintage instant film cameras and Impossible Project (@impossible_hq) film, the group took photos with both smartphone and analog film on a photowalk around Soho before decamping to experiment with techniques in printing their Instagram photos using instant film.
“People enjoy seeing an image being created right in front of their eyes, so there’s a natural synergy between Instagram and instant film,” says InstaMeet organiser Tom Skipp (@tomskipp). “It was great to be able to share these moments with people that are so passionate. Seeing and sharing an image developing is a beautiful thing, like the original Instagram!”
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"We all have souls of different ages."
F. Scott Fitzgerald (via purplebuddhaproject)
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nickdrake:

Lauren and Humphrey (The Big Sleep).
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"I will love you when you are a still day.
I will love you when you are a hurricane."
Clementine von Radics (via pureblyss)
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kitty-en-classe:

ph. Claude Alexandre, Sans titre, 1981 Collection Maison Européenne de la Photographie
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"A passionate woman is worth the chaos."
without doubt.  (via thatkindofwoman)